Geiriadur i Dysgwyr

Geiriadur i Ddysgwyr: Ar-lein / Dictionary for Learners: Online

This reference guide contains over 1600 common words. To support those new to the language, the most common words also have a pronunciation guide. Under the English word is the Welsh word on the left, with the approximate pronunciation using English sounds to the right. The stressed sound is underlined. For a fuller explanation, click the ‘How to Use This Guide’ button below. Full credit for the content goes to Mark Stonelake.

How to Use This Guide

All | A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W Y
There are 95 names in this directory beginning with the letter P.
p.m.
yr hwyr (y.h.), uhr hoo-eer

P.S.
O.N.

painful
poenus, poy-niss

pants
trôns/pants, trônz/pants

paper (local Welsh language)
papur bro, pah-pir broh

paper (to)
papuro, pah-pir-oh

parish
plwyf

part time
rhan amser, rhan amsseh-r

partidges
petris, petriss

path
llwybr, lloo-eebir

patient (to be)
amyneddgar, amuneddgah-r

patron saint
nawddsant

peace
heddwch

pepper
pupur, pipir

perceive (to)
canfod

percent
cant (y)

percentage
canran

period (of time)
cyfnod, kuvnod

pet
anifail anwes, an-ee-vile anwess

petition
deiseb (b), die-sseb

photocopy (to)
llungopïo, lleengopee-oh

picture(s)
llun(iau), lleen (llin-yeh)

pig
mochyn (moch), moh-chin (môch)

pile
pentwr

pilgrimage
pererindod (b)

pipe
piben (b)

place(s)
man(nau)

plague
pla

plait (to)
plethu

plaited
wedii blethu

plaits
plethi

plane
awyren (b)

play (a)
drama (b), drah-mah

play (to) (a game)
chwarae, whareh

play (to) (an instrument)
canu, kanee

play the harp (to)
canu'r delyn, kaneer delin

player
chwaraewr, (ch)whar-eye-oor

playful
chwareus, (ch)wha-rice

playground
lle chwarae, lle (ch)whareh

pleased
balch

plumber
plymwr, plumoor

poet
bardd, bah-rdd

poison
gwenwyn

Poland
Gwlad Pwyl, Gwlâd Poo-eel

police
heddlu, hedd-lee

poor (bad)
gwael, gw-eye-l

poor (no money)
tlawd, tlah-wd

popular
poblogaidd, poblogedd

posh people
crachach

potato(es)
taten (b) (tatws/tato), tah-ten (tah-twss/toh)

pouring down with rain
arllwys y glaw

poverty
tlodi

praise (to)
canmol

praise highly (to)
canmol ir cymylau

prefer (I) (lit. It's better with me)
mae'n well 'da fi, mine weh-ll dah vee

prepare thoroughly (to)
paratoi'n drylwyr, parah-toy'n drulwir

present(s)/gift(s)
anrheg(ion) (b), an-rheg (anrhegyon)

present/dedicate (to)
cyflwyno (i), kuvloo-eenoh

presenter
cyflwynydd, kuvloo-eenidd

president
arlywydd

pressure
pwysau

prevent from (to)
atal rhag

prickly (thin-skinned - person)
pigog, peegog

primary school
ysgol gynradd (b), uhssgol gunrâdd

prince(s)
tywysog(ion)

principality
tywysogaeth (b)

printer
argraffydd, ahr-graff-iddd

prize(s)
gwobr(au) (b), gwobohr (gwobreh)

procession/march
gorymdaith (b)

produce (to)
cynhyrchu, kunhurchee

produce material
cynhyrchu deunydd

producer
cynhyrchydd, kunhurchidd

programme(s)
rhaglen(ni) (b), rhah-glen (rhah-glenee)

prominent
amlwg

prose
rhyddiaith

prosecute (to)
erlyn

prosecution
erlyniad

protester (protesters)
protestiwr (protestwyr), Pro-test-yoor

proud of
falch o

proud/pleased
balch, bah-lch

prove (to)
profi, provee

proverb
dihareb (b)

public (the)
cyhoedd (y cyhoedd), uh kuhoedd

public eye (from the)
o lygaid y cyhoedd, o luged uh kuhoedd

public footpath
llwybr cyhoeddus, llooeebir kuhoeddiss

public place
man cyhoeddus

public school
ysgol fonedd (b)

public services
gwasanaethau cyhoeddus

publicity
cyhoeddusrwydd

punish (to)
cosbi

pupil(s)
disgybl(ion), diss-gib-l (diss-gub-lee-on

purposes
dibenion

put on weight (to)
magu pwysau

put up with (to)
goddef

putting things in order
rhoi trefn ar bethau, rhoy trevn ar betheh


Pronunciation Guide

In Welsh words the stress usually falls on the last but one syllable (a syllable is a unit of sound). Putting stress on a syllable means lengthening the sound with more emphasis in the voice.

For example, people with a Welsh accent would pronounce the surname Meredith as Mer-ed-ith, with the last sound but one ‘ed’ stressed. People with an English accent would tend to put equal weight on all three syllables – Mer-ed-ith.

If the stress falls on the last syllable of a Welsh word it is usually marked by an accent e.g. carafán. There are very few words like this in Welsh.

Try saying these words: – canol – canolfan. The stress moves on each time a unit of sound or syllable is added.

Abbreviations used

(adj) adjective- a describing word
(b) benywaidd – feminine (noun)
(col) colloquial– a word used in one area of Wales
(au) ….(s) plurals e.g. shop(s) – siop(au)
adre(f) (f) not pronounced
{rhed} root/stem of the verb e.g. rhedeg {rhed-}
(t.ll.) treiglad llaes – the word causes an aspirate mutation
(t.t.) treiglad trwynol – the word causes a nasal mutation
(t.m.) treiglad meddal – the word causes a soft mutation
(adj.) adjective
….(to) verb e.g. talk (to) – to talk
(tag) tags are short questions that we put on the end of sentences such as ‘…isn’t it?’
N.W. a word used in North Wales
S.W. a word used in South Wales

Further resources

For a complete learner’s dictionary I recommend Heini Gruffudd’s Welsh Learner’s Dictionary, and for a comprehensive online dictionary go to Geiriadur Prifysgol Cymru.

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